New to Linux and Manjaro - Tips

Hi! I am new to both Linux and Manjaro. Are there any tips or resources that will make the transition easier? Thanks!

The forum rules: Forum Rules - Manjaro

The search function : Search results for '' - Manjaro Linux Forum

How to provide good information: How to provide good information

The tutorials section Tutorials - Manjaro Linux Forum

3 Likes

And, of course, there’s also the Manjaro Wiki and the Arch Wiki. :wink:

3 Likes

My tip: enjoy the ride :slight_smile:

Don’t give up! It might seem hard, but it’s worth it!!!

Best tips I can give are always read the announcement thread’s before updating, keep an upto date live usb and take regular backups. Linux is pretty robust and you can fix just about anything with a live usb/manjaro chroot and if all else fails you can restore a backup

If your favorite Windows applications aren’t available on Linux, this may help:

4 Likes

It is also a good idea to read Linux books avalaible in the internet.
Search for linux bokks pdf or similar.
I also recommend reading the Frebsd book: https://www.freebsd.org

You can also try to use Gentoo Linux.

1 Like

This is bound to make you appreciative of the easier distros. :grin::wink:

1 Like

I admit: Gentoo is for Linux enthusiasts.

1 Like

Timeshift

:slight_smile:

2 Likes

Checkout these Manjaro posts:

1 Like

Before you start making things work better :face_with_hand_over_mouth: first back up that file.
For example:
file_name.bak
or
file_name.old
and burn ISO just in case your improvements gone terrible wrong. We all improve something all the time, so it’s nothing unusual, and it’s part of learning :slight_smile:

Btw, if some day you want to mix different desktop environments or something, virtual machine (VM) will be perfect for this :slight_smile:

Edit:
Using meld can be useful from time to time (.pacnew files etc).

1 Like

If you are not new to Linux but just new to Manjaro, I would as already suggested learn to do system backups with TimeShift to be able to restore the system to a previous state in case you mess something, and I would also learn to chroot your system from a live USB environment to learn how to do maintenance operation on your real system from the live environment.

These are two things that every user should learn to always have a solution in case you have an issue. The Manjaro WIKI is a good place for information.

1 Like

This could be a good place to start:
https://ryanstutorials.net/linuxtutorial/

The author also compiled a cheat sheet.

1 Like

All I could share that may be useful is my notes on porting the home directory from other distributions. Since you’re new to Linux in general though (welcome BTW) that’s of little relevance here.

A tip I can offer though is to go for the KDE desktop if you’re coming from Windows; It’s not just the most modern one (in my opinion) but also very customizable, thus you can make it look and feel just like Win and barely notice the change… even its default configuration is very friendly to Win users.