Why do many of you prefer KDE over Cinnamon or Budgie

#1

I can understand XFCE for older hardware/sentimental reasons, but why does it seem like the majority of Manjaro users prefer KDE? Is there some secret functionality that the rest of us don’t know?
I’m stuck on KDE right now, because I feel that this is were I will learn most, but I much prefer Cinnamon and Budgie (and XFCE).
I would love to hear your opinions on this, regardless of which DE you use.

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#2

Kde is pretty much the only desktop in the same weight class as gnome. Cinnamon and budgie are gnome derivatives and subject to possible instability caused by gtk updates, which are made with gnome in mind.

Gnome and kde are the two big ones. Kde is so flexible that there is no real need for forking it, and it defaults to the popular classic desktop layout anyway. It was designed to be a classical desktop environment from the start. On the other hand, cinnamon and budgie attempts at turning gnome back into a classical desktop, and they must sometimes struggle against their roots. Because of this, kde ends up being the most polished classical environment.

If we take deepin into consideration… It is just too new and unstable to compete as of yet.

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#3

wow. That was a most comprehensible reply, thank you!
I never liked Gnome proper, but Cinnamon and Budgie kind of feel relatable. BTW, my background is Mac OS not Windows, as I’ve heard people compare Cinnamon to Windoze. My main driver to this date, since I first installed Manjaro has been KDE. I find it very difficult to work with. But I keep thinking there is more there than meets the eye, so I keep coming back to it.
Thank you very much Mr. Golden mouth :wink:

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#4

When I started with Linux there were 2 worlds: Gnome (more popular with users coming from apple) and KDE (more popular with users coming from win). I liked KDE better.
I installed both, so if the config files for KDE got borked I could usually use a GUI/DE to fix it. Later on I switched to Cinnamon as my second DE, because it looks more like Win/KDE with the default bottom panel, left-bottom start-menu.
I have occasionally installed other DEs, and then uninstalled them.
KDE + Gnome as backup is good enough for me. Though I almost exclusively use KDE.

#5

" Gnome (more popular with users coming from apple)"
No way. As a Mac user from the late 80’s I see no relation with Gnome.
Perhaps with its forks like Cinnamon or Budgie, but not Gnome. KDE is more familiar to me as a Mac OS user than Gnome, which is more like a Win XP copy.

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#6

I always liked KDE and i had a long break after that. Therefore i stared with the xfce iso and actually liked it alot.Tried some budgie thumbs up. We have really come a long way with this many good desktop mangers.

I did end up installing kde and looks like im going to stick with it.
Back in the days i think there was only kde and gnome.
But now i see the usability of something lighter on a low ram computer.
Also if you only use terminals why not have 3 and no menus.

#7

This plus some of us not caring for gnome - besides it seems easier to trim the fat on KDE. Some others might disagree, but I’ve always felt gnome to be more of a memory hog.

Then of course there is the eternal GTK vs QT. Which I’m not even going to touch.

#8

That is the general description I read when I started. Not all users conform, of course.

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#9

I’m not going to comment on gnome/Kde as i use both but cinnamon budgie use very outdated gtk 3 versions for the interface and it shows as dated not that they are bad, cinnamon really works well on Gentoo, on Arch it just not does not feel comfortable, KDE/Gnome on the other hand although chalk and cheese design work fine and feel comfortable to use for me anyway.

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#10

Well, I am running i3 because I am just sick and tired of all the crap showing up on any “classic” DE. It prevents you from what you really want to do with your Computer. Not just staring at it and beeing happy about the design of your Desktop.
I rather stumbled accidently over Manjaro i3 and thanks to the work of @oberon I am as happy with my computer as I could ever be. PLUS it is a Surface Pro.
The stuff I want to do is accelerated 10 times (if not more). No more stupid mouse pushing, no more scanning thru idiotic menus, no more . Just impressively effective tools that do exactly what you want.
But this is just an oppinion about DEs comming from someone who encountered computers in the shape of an IBM terminal - and still got the work done.

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#11

Depends on the version, currently kde is lighter. imho gnome is more of cpu hog than a memory hog.

With weight class I was referring to the size of the team and the level of polish. Cinnamon team is not big enough that they could have built cinnamon from scratch without forking it from gnome. Because of that, when cinnamon devs try to preserve features that gnome has removed, they are essentially stuck with old gnome technology. They don’t have the manpower to really progress the fork in the way that gnome is progressing their branch.

Kde and gnome are much bigger projects than the other desktops are.

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#12

I have to say… I like xfce. No one asked, but there it is. :slight_smile: There’s just not much you can’t do with xfce4. I’m also beginning to think that LXQT with kwin might have a bright future. At least my prototypes are looking good; and lxqt is just at v 0.13 (of course it took forever to get to this point).

#13

As far as I know the main business customers will use Gnome (Ubuntu, Red Hat) or KDE (SuSe), so that is where the long term effort is. All the derived DEs run greater risks of just disappearing, though the size of the community behind some DEs is sizeable enough. I just install the two main ones and that’s good. In practice, many users will find they like some gnome and some kde packages anyway.

#14

For me there are a few reasons:

  • The degree of customization possible - You can make plasma look and function pretty much however you want.
    • Want a Windows clone? No problem.
    • Want it to look like a mac with a dock and global menus? No problem.
    • Want something else totally different than either totally customized to your desires? No problem.
  • The ease and control you have over unifying theming across qt & gtk

For me, it is all about making things work the way I want to them to. plasma does that for me.

That being said, I use almost no k* apps.

I find gnome completely unusable but there is no way it is anything like a Win XP copy.

For the record, I like budgie but it is not very customizable.

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#15

I ran GNOME for many years and switched to KDE Plasma a couple of years ago. Recently, I gave GNOME another try, but I ended up returning to KDE. Some points:

  1. I like the KDE applications. I use kile (LaTeX IDE) daily, okular is superior to evince, gwenview is superior to eye of gnome (it previews RAW files, it lets you choose the data you want to be displayed in the side panel etc.), kdenlive is awesome, krita is awesome, kate has far more options than gedit, dolphin is awesome (press F4 for an integrated terminal, press F3 for split view, RAW previews with a single click, one can select for which folders thumbnail previews should be displayed, right click on a file and send it via bluetooth to a phone, etc.), spectacle is an excellent screenshot tool, and so on. Also: kdevelop, ark, etc.

  2. KDE Connect is truly amazing.

  3. I like to have the files I transfer from trusted devices via bluetooh (my phone, my tablet etc.) to be automatically accepted and to be saved in a folder other than Downloads (without having to install an additional software for that).

  4. I like to switch audio devices with a simple drag and drop (without having to install extensions) as I show in this video

  1. KDE Plasma comes by default with Vaults, which allows me to password-protect some folders.

  2. When I plug an external monitor or projector to my laptop, Plasma asks me how I want to handle that. It gives me a menu of options. I find that quite useful.

  3. I recommend the following video, which shows how powerful KDE Plasma can be: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxs5OwhD6ew

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#16

While OpenSUSE has a lot of KDE developers, I think their enterprise product has been Gnome for some time.

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#17

That’s sad. I’m not “stuck” on KDE, i am an enthusiastically pleased plasmoid who evolved to KDE after trying most of the other DE’s when i chose to exit Windoze in late 2013.

For me, it boils down to my realisation that at least wrt distro DE’s the lovely luminous lamentably-late Chrissie Amphlett was wrong; there’s no Fine Line but instead a wide chasm. Simply, Plasma gives me Pleasure, whereas all others give me varying degrees of Pain.

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#18

Even though I’m a long time KDE user, my main concern of choosing KDE over any other DE is only 1 word: flexibility. Any GNOME derivative, including GNOME itself, is too rigid for my wild computing soul. I like to customize and KDE serves me the best among the competitions. Secondary concern, it has so many apps in its realm that integrates very well with the DE while being modular at the same time. For instance, Kate has embedded terminal which is essentially Konsole, its editor is the same KTextEditor used in Kile, KWrite, KDevelop and many more.

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#19

Like some of you mentioned before, I also like the applications KDE provides. I even use the KDE pim suite which is very questionable for many of the other forum users.
I like the easiness to change nearly everything I want to change like themes or colours.
And perhaps because I’ve used it now for many years. Never change a winning team. :grinning:

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#20

As told others, it’s flexibility and customization. Sometimes it even looks that there’re too much options to choose from. It took some time for me to configure “my” setup of how it looks. But now i’m settled strongly on KDE, even if i hated it just several years ago.
Something good did happen back then in this DE developement and users just flow after this good vibe.

No other DE could offer such experience for user, as KDE. For example, i spended much time on QtCurve window decorations, but it gave me a possibility to build my own experience without breaking everything or developer knowledge necessity. And it’s only one (even not the main) way to choose from for your decoractions.

I guess that the possibility to choose from is the main reason why i’m settled on this DE. KDE doesn’t force me to use it the way some guy sees it. KDE just gives me an easy possibility to build the experience i like.

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