"New stuff" introduction to rolling release... somehow better?

Over the time it seems Manjaro introduces new packages and stuff to the "main" or "base" package of the OS. I mean new installation ISO by default installs usually more stuff than the previous one. I would really like if the new additions (new packages, that previously were not) would somehow be automatically included in the rolling release "stable" updates also. Or at least given the option to include them automatically ... or a list of new stuff with checkboxes and option to choose what of of them I would like to include, so I don't have to go out and try to figure out one by one what has been added over the time...

...and/or option to somehow compare my current packages to the "current official version installation" packages (especially those that official installation side has more over my installation), and then there add my ignore option for those differences I do not care about (have previously intentionally removed) and see the new additions (not in the ignore list)?

A changelog with the release announcement would cover that. If the system update was able to install new packages or remove ones that have been taken out of the latest ISO it would piss a lot of users off. The option to apply them automatically would be difficult to implement.

5 Likes

it has both cons and pros
with it.
the only thing i can think is meta package.
it will add new packages as added.

1 Like

that's too much like W10 for my liking. I don't like that OS installing new stuff without my say so on my gaming rig so sure as hell wouldn't want Linux distributions to start doing the same

2 Likes

Take a look at the list of packages available where you download the ISO.

I mean the storage at OSDN - https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro/storage

What has been added is the support for snap and flatpak - this has some dependencies but other than that - the collection of packages on the official ISO stays the same.

3 Likes

running a diff on that and the package list from your own system would work :+1:

2 Likes

Yes. But wouldn't it be wise to inform people that snap and flatpak support is now like "more official"? (Also included over 8.1.0 was Timeshift and Oxygen (for KDE at least) also... and wpebackend-fdo, libwpe, kernel-alive, libgee...). Yes ofc "running a diff" would give us some information, but ... who does that on every update? Wouldn't it be nice if we had like... a list of new things added over versions somewhere... with option to simply click "Install" button for convenience, if we would also try this new thing out?

It has been announced again and again in the announcement threads and it has caused heated discussions on the forum.

As stated on the Manjaro web - it is your computer - your system - your data.

Manjaro will never install any on a users system. That means that automatic installation of new technologies because they are included on new install media - that will not happen.

If you as existing enduser want support for such new technology you have to install it by your self.

This is not Windows but a small distribution brought to you by the Manjaro community and a handful of skilled developers, packagers and maintainers.

As already stated an official editions package set is clearly defined and that package set does change much if at all.

3 Likes

Not every update, just when an ISO is released. Anyway it would be whoever has FOMO

2 Likes

Alright, fair enough. However there is a big difference between:
a) installing automatically without option to opt out (Win10); :frowning:
b) informing you and giving you option to install (my wish) -- ideally for every new packet/feature separately; and/or option to opt in for automatic installation, if I feel brave enough, with option to always unckeck the checkbox later and opt out again; :slight_smile:
c) not informing you at all and expecting you to find out yourself ... maybe... if ever... (current manjaro default). ... feeding my FOMO :woozy_face:

Heya i made a little bash script for that, since I think it's a nice idea.
When new releases come out you would have to change the URL in the script for the edition you are looking for.
Change line 10 to the edition you want to look at ( gnome,kde,xfce )
Have fun!

#!/usr/bin/bash
SHELL=/usr/bin/bash

# Tell the script what you are looking for
gnome="http://rwthaachen.dl.osdn.jp/storage/g/m/ma/manjaro/gnome/18.1.2/manjaro-gnome-18.1.2-191028-linux53-pkgs.txt"
kde="https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro/storage/kde/18.1.2/manjaro-kde-18.1.2-191028-linux53-pkgs.txt"
xfce="https://osdn.net/projects/manjaro/storage/xfce/18.1.2/manjaro-xfce-18.1.2-191028-linux53-pkgs.txt"

# download latest pkg info
wget ${gnome}
file="echo *pkgs.txt"

# generate list of installed packages
pacman -Q > pacman.txt

# compare results
cat ${file} | cut -d' ' -f1 > comp1.txt
cat pacman.txt | cut -d' ' -f1 > comp2.txt
diff -u comp2.txt comp1.txt | grep -E "^\+" | sed '1d'  | cut -c2-  | tee pkglist.txt # Packages from Release which are not installed local
diff -u comp1.txt comp2.txt | grep -E "^\+" | sed '1d'  | cut -c2-  | tee userpkglist.txt # Packages installed by User

# clean up
rm -rf *pkgs.txt comp1.txt comp2.txt pacman.txt

# install different packages
# sudo pacman -S - < pkglist.txt

The pkglist.txt file contains the new apps from the release which are not installed on the local system.

Edit: I have changed the script a bit to clean up and commented the installation part. The userpkglist.txt file could be used as a backup of packages installed by the user for a fresh install. But I think it also could have applications listed which have been removed from new releases but are installed local.
Handle with care :wink:

3 Likes

... the list is too long and scary. Have I really missed so much? :confused:

some of this I have definitely uninstalled myself (thunderbird; vlc; kio), but maybe 5-10% max of all of this only... 90+% just randomly missed due to updates being sneaky?

aribb24
attica
bluedevil
bluez-qt
fwupd
hdparm
hplip
intel-ucode
karchive
kauth
kbookmarks
kcodecs
kcompletion
kconfig
kconfigwidgets
kcoreaddons
kcrash
kdbusaddons
kdeconnect
kernel-alive
kget
kglobalaccel
kguiaddons
ki18n
kiconthemes
kio
kitemviews
kjobwidgets
knotifications
kpmcore3
kservice
ktextwidgets
kwallet
kwidgetsaddons
kwindowsystem
kxmlgui
libdvbpsi
libebml
libfakekey
libgee
libksane
libmatroska
libsmbios
libtar
libupnp
libxmlb
manjaro-application-utility
noto-fonts-cjk
partitionmanager3
qgpgme
skanlite
solid
sonnet
thunderbird
timeshift
tlp
vlc
wallpapers-juhraya
xdg-desktop-portal-kde
xf86-input-elographics
aribb24
attica
bluedevil
bluez-qt
fwupd
hdparm
hplip
intel-ucode
karchive
kauth
kbookmarks
kcodecs
kcompletion
kconfig
kconfigwidgets
kcoreaddons
kcrash
kdbusaddons
kdeconnect
kernel-alive
kget
kglobalaccel
kguiaddons
ki18n
kiconthemes
kio
kitemviews
kjobwidgets
knotifications
kpmcore3
kservice
ktextwidgets
kwallet
kwidgetsaddons
kwindowsystem
kxmlgui
libdvbpsi
libebml
libfakekey
libgee
libksane
libmatroska
libsmbios
libtar
libupnp
libxmlb
manjaro-application-utility
noto-fonts-cjk
partitionmanager3
qgpgme
skanlite
solid
sonnet
thunderbird
timeshift
tlp
vlc
wallpapers-juhraya
xdg-desktop-portal-kde
xf86-input-elographics

Actually I remove plenty of stuff when installing the system.

In general I think that a better approach than having all the potential apps that you could need always installed is just doing so with the daily used ones. While installing the rest only in the very moment you need them, and uninstalling them afterwards.

In that context is better having by default the bare minimum installed out of the box, while recommending the best applications for a particular appliance in some wiki.

To avoid spamming this thread, you can find my latest experiments with this idea here: :grin:


Have Fun!

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