Manjaro for Linux newbies? Vol. N+1 ;)


#1

Any modern OS is not a testing ground for solving problems, but a means to realize the needs of the user. :wink:

I learned Linux not badly, but I do not consider myself a guru and sometimes I want to just work in the OS and not solve problems after the next update.

Probably for this reason, for all its wretchedness, Windows holds a leading position in the market OS.


[Stable Update] 2018-05-07 - Kernels, Mesa, Glibc, PHP, Nvidia, Plasma5, Firefox
#2

Neither is Manjaro, but given the large number of updates that constantly “roll” through rolling release distros issue are bound to occur from time to time.

That is the reason for threads like these and the potential issues post at the top. Linux distros are a disparate collection of individually developed packages, melded into a cohesive operating system. Upstream bugs or integration issues … or user errors with pacnew files … will occur.

If you are not confident then wait a couple of days, read the update thread and get an understanding of possible issues and workarounds of other users.

Contrary to popular belief Manjaro is not suitable for complete Linux novices IMO … no rolling release distro is really. Linux greenhorns IMO should start with something like Mint, get to grips with Linux, and eventually migrate to distros like Manjaro if more current software and a rolling model interests them.

Now that Microborg has switched W10 to rolling release updates it has been causing a number of serious issues … at least with Linux you can switch to a more stable version release distro if you wish (ie Mint).

As for their market position, anti-competitive business practices over the last 25 years is the primary reason for market dominance … not their OS.

Linux is not Windoze.


#3

Not a good choice to suggest fixed release for desktop, the development of Linux and Open Source increasing monthes after monthes and with fixed release a Windows user fastly says: that’s too old… And Rolling is better for recent hardware.

Anyway no members in our makes communication in our discord voice channel about other distros that’s logic. Promotion for Mint in TNV = Ban immediately :slight_smile:


#4

Manjaro policy is not to disparage other distros.

Mint is a really good distro, perfect for users very new to Linux with virtually no Linux knowledge or experience.

I don’t believe Manajro is suited to brand new Linux users with no knowledge, no rolling release distro is, especially those users who expect everything to be done for them.


#5

I’ve a lot and a lot of users quitting mint/ubuntu IRL and says it’s just a piece of c… and retuning to Windows. With 200 manjaro IRL installs in 2,5 years. Users installed in Manjaro stay in Manjaro. Just say Manjaro says and that’s in it documentation: Manjaro is for novice users. You believe about that or not, I think it’s just a “congnitive dissonance” problem when you say it’s not for noobs. If you are not noob you have archlinux


#6

Moderately technical novice users willing to read and learn, yes.

Virtual luddites simply trying to escape Windoze with no technical inclination, no.

Mint was just an example distro, substitute any other version distro you prefer.

We can agree to disagree on this one.


#7

Just think about that:
If Linux don’t want to increase it’s number of users, Windows prepare not just for Azure a plan to have a Linux based Windows. And that’s will crush Linux and not just for Desktop (Windows 10 end of support 2025). If linux are not competitive it can be loose the actual little progression to desktop and a big server part.
Less market part = Less softwares, less hardware support…

The fixed release model (like mint) has FAILED. Manjaro is now the first in distrowatch. This distro can make a better desktop linux future with the combination of official repo and amazing AUR mega repo. In TNV Aur is enabled by default and there is no problem about that with ultra beginners.

That’s why i just be anger about a manual system migrating nvidia to nvidia 390x, it’s just an arch way system.


#8

Like you I don’t really like fixed release distros either, but more people use fixed release model than rolling release model distros.

Many more … Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora users … and all the users of the many forks.

Manjaro is predominantly Arch, with custom kernels a few tools & overlays to simplify install and maintenance. Arch makes Manjaro possible, given Manjaro is basically maintained by a small group of individuals in their spare time.

Anyway, this is way off topic for this thread, if you feel strongly about it then create a new thread.


#9

Ok create it :slight_smile:


#10

You have some very valid points here. Please start a thread that outlines the big picture as in your post above… then bring into focus how Manjaro can balance “user friendly” with rolling development work.


#11

Strongly wholly completely unreservedly unambiguously agree. Much as i’m [still] loving Manjaro KDE, i’d been “feeling” for some time when i read the occasional posts from users pondering getting some non-geeky family member off Windoze & onto Manjaro, that they might be making a big rod for their own backs. Now, given the large dollop of shock & confusion i’ve been dealing with over the past 48 hours wrt the previously unheard of & frankly onerous & intimidating need that i apparently now have for all future updates to manage pacnew files, my opinion now is that noobs & vanillas are likely to not find happiness in Manjaro. Frankly the past 48 hrs has been a helluva slog for me, due to pacnews, + i still need to implement the workaround/solution for Timeshift & GUFW no longer launching.

A final thought on the pacnews… OMZ if i have to do this, on my two real Manjaros & my two VM Manjaros, every one or two weeks [Stable], what the fook is it now like for all you brave souls on Unstable & Testing? You must be inspecting, merging, deleting your pacnews non-stop til the cows come home, only to have to do it all over again in a day or two. Ugh. So far, for me, pacnews represent a very unpleasant hiccup in my Manjaro journey.


#12

I think in both cases the sddm.conf edit proposed here will do :slight_smile:


#13

You are right, a rolling release (especially arch-based) is not for the beginner, you need to have basic understanding like how to login to tty etc.

Anyhow, generally you can ignore pacnew files, i have not cared for one in years and expect the update post to contain specific instructions if some breaking change is introduced via them.


#14

Oh yes indeed, i’m not ignoring that, & am hopeful it will fix the problem here. It’s just that i’ve wasted most of today “managing” these horrible pacnew files, & still have another pc to do. Blah, not fun. Sometime after that i’ll try that solution. Thanks.


#15

I managed nothing in pacnew, and you don’t have to. KDE is buggy that’s just not Manjaro fault. We have a mate TNV editions with no probs since 1 year and no probs actually


#16

You can, but you shouldn’t … and you definitely shouldn’t recommend this.

Pacnew files are changes to default pacakge config files, like new config options or new default config values. Pacman creates pacnew files so your original config files are not clobbered.


#21

I’m pretty confident in recommending it since you need to know what you are doing before merging the pacnew files. If you don’t, then it is best to just ignore and then fix when something breaks.


#22

These would become long-term help vampires seekers on Manjaro forum.

Otherwise I fully agree:

with ^this.


#23

I think the wording of the homepage should really be changed to something like this (or something that reflects this) so that we can finally end “you said Manjaro is for beginners” issue that keeps popping up every now and then.
Especially now that people see the DW rank and expect it to work like Mint (or Windows).


#24

This is part of the problem with modern computing as a whole and society too.

Everyone just wants the easy route and expects everything to be handed to them with as little effort as possible.

While having things work OOTB is nice, life isn’t like that. There is nothing really “hard” about Linux in general as a desktop user, if you are prepared to read a little. In fact it gets better every single year.

I just think people get more lazy and other distros seem to cater to them a bit too much so they don’t really have to learn when it’s all handed to them.