Failed experiment with openSUSE Tumbleweed

I read an excellent review of openSUSE Tumbleweed about a week ago. I tried it on a live ISO, and I was impressed. The theming is gorgeous. They have an OBS repo with prebuilt kernel modules for common hardware, so no more need to compile rtl8821ce-dkms-git from AUR. Yast is amazing and powerful.

They don't recommend installing from live media, so I downloaded the 4.4 GiB installation DVD and installed it last night. I installed the hardware drivers and all of the packages I wanted. I got multimedia codecs working with Packman. I installed Chrome using Google's official repo for openSUSE. Today I updated the system. I logged out and was going to reboot from SDDM, but I automatically got logged back in. [For the record, I have autologin disabled.] My desktop appeared, but no apps would launch, and there was no Shutdown or Reboot option in the menu. I switched to TTY and rebooted with systemctl reboot. As it's starting back up, I notice the following messages in the systemd output:

Stopped target Local File Systems.
Unmounting /opt
Unmounting /root
Unmounting /usr/local
Unmounting /srv
Unmounting /boot/grub2/x86_64-efi
Unmounting /boot/grub2/i386-pc

All of those subvolumes successfully mounted a few seconds earlier. This is a major issue. I can use most of my apps like normal now, but Google Chrome won't launch because it's in the /opt subvolume. Because /root is not mounted, things like root's custom bash config and Kate settings won't load.

That last sentence brings me to another gripe. Kate won't elevate privileges when needed and still needs to be launched with kdesu to edit files owned by root. Also, many simple tasks like "filefrag" and "traceroute" require root privileges to run. I can't even edit wifi connection settings without being asked for root's password.

I experienced bugs with Tumbleweed 3 years ago, but I figured things got better since then. I will be deleting it tomorrow and reinstalling Manjaro, which I was foolish enough to delete after seeing how pretty my new installation of Tumbleweed was. At least I have a backup of my important files from /home.

I won't use openSUSE Leap because it contains old packages and an old kernel that get updated to newer versions only once yearly.

Don’t feel alone, I used Leap for a while then switched to Tumbleweed. I had something odd happen with updates that caused the system to fall over. I was still a Linux noob at the time so I didn’t troubleshoot. I too, came back to Manjaro. Tumbleweed is more bleeding edge than Manjaro, so it makes sense there’s a higher chance of breakage.

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I'm with @anon85858489 on the breakage. Not even two weeks ago I blasted their devs for being too cutting edge cause they added the KDE 15.19 update the day it was released by KDE. No due diligence on testing.

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This is one of my biggest complaints of suse in general. They are one of the last distros to be hanging on to the legacy of using root for everything. Even sudo is setup to require the root password. Because all the graphical administration applications are run as root, they break theming unless you are using the default theme.

My other complaint is that if you run OSTW for any extended period of time, you eventually end up with constant dependency issues that need resolving.

I have always found suse a big disappointment its such a polished distro has great tools but under the hood its just a mess, every release is just pot luck what will work and what will not, such a shame they could do so much better RPMs used to be a dependency hell Pclinux has never suffered from it, Fedora and the rest has virtually eliminated it, that leaves suse they just do not seem to see dependency hell as a problem.

@anon11646911 that one nasty btrfs bug.

I just can't deal with this setup anymore. Sure, it nice to have when you don't know what your doing. But it to annoying once do know what your doing.

@mandog have PCLinuxOS move to dnf?

He uses apt

Even though there known to used rpm packages?

http://www.pclinuxoshelp.com/index.php/Update_Your_PCLinuxOS

It seems to be an rpm version of apt.

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