Can't find where to boot into Manjaro

I am currently running Debian, Mint, and Windows 10. After Manjaro’s installation, it doesn’t appear in my BIOS boot override menu, nor does it appear in Debian’s GRUB. I tried using os-prober followed by grub-mkconfig /boot/grub/grub.cfg, and it seemed to find Manjaro, but it’s still not in the boot menu.

Not sure if you’re uefi booting or bios-legacy booting. I suspect both (without you suspecting).
See if this helps.
If need further help, provide output from any linux OS (state which when providing) the following
sudo fdisk -l
sudo blkid
test -d /sys/firmware/efi && echo UEFI || echo BIOS

and other information, like ‘Im 100% sure it is bios-legacy’ or "I don’t know’, ‘windows 10 cannot boot after I installed debian’ or ‘I have a cat’ …

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Thank you very much, the linked article fixed my issue. I now boot by default into Manjaro’s GRUB over Debian’s.

2 Likes

I have nearly gone mad trying to find what it is that messes up grub in Debian along manjaro.

I had an installation on usb stick and it run fine. I even tried linux 4.12 and it run fine. So I decided to install on disk. I made a partition and copied (dd) from usb to disk. The first boot was ok, after unplugging the usb and rebooting to Debian I (sudo update-grub) and rebooted. Kernel panic and hard freeze.
So after checking the uuid difference and corrected the installations /etc/fstab to the correct ones I double rebooted to get my debian grub find manjaro and add it properly.
No show!
So I think I tried 2-3 times and always thought I messed something up copying /home stuff to new /home.

Eventually I gave up

I am now writing from my hd installation but booting up from my manjaro usb. Debian grub breaks Manjaro. Could be an older version of grub than Manjaro uses but still I can’t explain how it finds the partition and its available linux.kernels to boot by but it will run into a fatal error.

I understand what you are saying of replacing grub with manjaro’s version that will start debian but I want to know why it happens. Maybe I can create 2 grub.cfg files and compare them, cut the manjaro part out and paste it into debian’s grub.

But I have run out of steam for the day and my eyes are preventing me to carry on.

PS By the way, I have used a common /home folder for users of 2 or more installations, I haven’t had problems unless the usernames are different.
I have also shared swap space/swapfile for two installations of linux-based distros. No problem.

No. Debian does not use older version. Manjaro modifies grub.

Because Manjaro uses a different way to implement intel-ucode and requires a modification of grub to boot. Other OS builds intel-ucode into the kernel and don’t need grub modification, so it will pick up Manjaro parameters (the normal way) which won’t boot Manjaro.

1 Like

OK, the same system that use to boot up a few times now it is failing. I can barely get into a shell with root, I uninstalled grub and reinstalled it, update-grub doesn’t even find other installations but itself and graphic display will not start.

Even my usb-installation is now broken trying to make it find the sda installation and providing good place to boot.

This is really exhausting, after 3 installations it all turns to crap over and over again.
If I can’t fix this one, after hours of configuring the desktop and the software I need I am giving up.
Grub should not be so damn hard for making its own system boot up.

Looks more like a hardware issue than a systems issue.
Too coincidental for both the usb and installed system to fail.

Believe me I trust my hardware in 3 machines to have never acted like this with many cohabitating linux and non-linux systems. This is a first for me in dealing with it in specific. And I have gone wild with grub updating and including functional entries of hd and usb live and permanent partitions. I would jump from one system (linux) to the next and create a new grub and it was all inclusive and functional for all.

This is a problem in the latest Manjaro grub! When it updates it does not even find its previously found partition installations. And at some point even its own entry is not functional in bringing up graphics. So you are left with a single system that can only boot to a root/shell. Xinit freezes everything up to a broken graphic picture and mouse pointer looks like a cross/X

THE FIX

Before you update grub or install another kernel make a backup of the existing functional /boot/grub/grub.cfg and preserve it like gold!

Then install new kernel and all but you have to add the entries manually for all other bootable partitions (look for the begin 20 - 30 - 40 … and end and add them to the bottom of the 10 - the Manjaro installation that was just updated. You will notice that all other grub entries are there but replaced with a blank space, begin 20 end 20 and nothing in between. I instead took the functional piece of the single Manjaro entry and included it in the grub from Debian replacing the simple Debian entry for Manjaro. All done!

All done till the next time something in Manjaro wishes to replace/update grub.cfg … and this can get really old if you are testing various kernels. Both versions of 4.9 have worked, the current 10 has worked, 4.11 worked, even 4.12 work.

IT IS ALL DUE TO FAULTY FUNCTIONING WITHIN GRUB’S UPDATING MECHANISM. I AM NOT A DEVELOPER SO I WILL NOT ATTEMPT TO ALTER THE CODE. But I can cut and paste .cfg and everntually I may figure out to add a script to copy grub.cfg at boot and another on shutdown/reboot and keep all copies.

Unfortunately before I figured all this out, I yet again wiped out day’s worth of work and made a new installation for ONE LAST TIME before I give up on Manjaro. Hopefully this can be fixed. On the new installation before I even exited I backed up the new grub.cfg and it is the backbone of editing all consequent grub.cfgs. I even keep the original 4.9 kernel so that entry will be the key back into the system.

I thought my machine would blow up from so many reboots and tests in the past few days, but it is all functional now on main installation and usb installation (portmanjaro) and with 4 different linux kernels installed on both.

BUT for a system that is meant to be user friendly and for people transitioning from windoze to linux, this ain’t it!

I challenge anyone with many systems to install another kernel and see what their grub entries will look like. Unless I am in a parallel universe’s repository of broken grub and nobody else is experiencing it.

Cheers, and criticism is good and constructive for development. The classic reaction of linux developers is that it is not our system it is your peculiar and unique situation that is at fault and needs hacking. A user friendly system should not require any hacking. But on a daily basis functional stuff get replaced with modified disfunctional stuff.

You have a Debian system OS that works now?
With Debian grub operating as default?

If yes, we can get your Manjaro booting (if it is installed properly).
Few things to need/confirm At debian terminal…
o system is msdos/bios-legacy (should be, but confirm, please)
o sudo blkid
o sudo parted -l
o Manjaro’s /etc/fstab
o What these partitions are (in your own words) like…
sda1 is Debian /
sda2 is swap
sda3 is Mnajaro install /
.

ps: I do not wish to answer your many things in last post, to save time, and also not relevant now, we can discuss late when you fix it (if you still wish - hint - you’ll lose the challenge)

I have stated with BOLD letters THE FIX
It is really simple if you know what it takes

1 Problem is the grub-update in Manjaro for the manjaro partition itself.

2 The 2nd problem is updating grub after a kernel installation removes all other entries from the grub.cfg and leaves them in there BLANK!!

Fixing my problem that was severely replicated by stock manjaro.iso reinstallation does not fix everyone else’s.

It did the same exact stupid thing over and over again. I just do not allow it anymore.

This is a Manjaro boot entry from its own grub:
A proper entry but look what it did to entry 2 (20_lin…) it wiped it and all subsequent entries. I did not do this, grub did automatically.

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###
menuentry 'Manjaro Linux' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-simple-dddddddddddddddddd' {
	savedefault
	load_video
	set gfxpayload=keep
	insmod gzio
	insmod part_msdos
	insmod ext2
	set root='hd0,msdos6'
	if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
	else
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root xxxxxxxxxx
	fi
	echo	'Loading Linux 4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
	linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=xxxxxxxxxxxxxx rw  quiet
	echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
	initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.11-x86_64.img
}
submenu 'Advanced options for Manjaro Linux' $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-advanced-yyyyyyyyyyy' {
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64-advanced-yyyyyyyyyyy' {
	savedefault
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root sssssssssssssssssssss
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=tttttttttttttttttttt rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.11-x86_64.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64 - fallback initramfs)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64-fallback-ddddddddddddddddddddd' {
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root tttttttttttttttttttttttttt
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.11.1-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=ffffffffffffffff rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.11-x86_64-fallback.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64-advanced-fffffffffffffffffffffffffffff' {
	savedefault
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  fffffffffffffffffffffff
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ffdddddddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.10-x86_64 root=UUID=ffddddddddddddddddd rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.10-x86_64.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64 - fallback initramfs)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64-fallback-ddddddddddddddddddddd' {
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ffddddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.10.16-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.10-x86_64 root=UUID=fffffffffffffffffffff rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.10-x86_64-fallback.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64-advanced-ffddddddddddddddddddddddddd' {
	savedefault
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddd
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root dddddddddddddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.9-x86_64 root=UUID=fdddddddddddddddrw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.9-x86_64.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64 - fallback initramfs)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64-fallback-dddddddddddddd' {
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  fddddddddddddddddddddddd
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ffddddddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.9.28-1-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.9-x86_64 root=UUID=ffdffffffffffffff rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.9-x86_64-fallback.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64-advanced-ddddddddddddddddddd' {
	savedefault
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ffddddddddddddddddddddddd
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ffddddddddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.9-rt-x86_64 root=UUID=ffdddddddddddddd rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.9-rt-x86_64.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel: 4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64 - fallback initramfs)' --class manjaro --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64-fallback-rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr' {
		load_video
		set gfxpayload=keep
		insmod gzio
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ggggggggggggggggggggggggg
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root fdddddddddddddd
		fi
		echo	'Loading Linux 4.9.27-1-rt18-MANJARO x64 ...'
		linux	/boot/vmlinuz-4.9-rt-x86_64 root=UUID=sssssssss rw  quiet
		echo	'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
		initrd	/boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-4.9-rt-x86_64-fallback.img
	}
}

### END /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###

### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###
### END /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###

here is a Manjaro standard grub menu entry that does not work:

menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (17.0.1) (on /dev/sda6)' --class manjarolinux --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-gnulinux-simple-ffffffffffffff' {
	insmod part_msdos
	insmod ext2
	set root='hd0,msdos6'
	if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ggggggggggggggggggggggg
	else
	  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root zzzzzzzzzz
	fi
	linux /boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=zzzzzzzzzzz rw quiet
	initrd /boot/intel-ucode.img
}
submenu 'Advanced options for Manjaro Linux (17.0.1) (on /dev/sda6)' $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-gnulinux-advanced-sssssssssssssss' {
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (on /dev/sda6)' --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-gnulinux-/boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64--sssssssssssssss' {
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ssssssssssssssssssss
		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root sssssssssssssssss
		fi
		linux /boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=zzzzzzzzzzzzz rw quiet
		initrd /boot/intel-ucode.img
	}
	menuentry 'Manjaro Linux (Kernel 4.11.0-1-MANJARO x64) (on /dev/sda6)' --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-gnulinux-/boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64--cccccccccccccccc' {
		insmod part_msdos
		insmod ext2
		set root='hd0,msdos6'
		if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,msdos6 --hint-efi=hd0,msdos6 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,msdos6  ssssssssssss		else
		  search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root ssssssssssssss
		fi
		linux /boot/vmlinuz-4.11-x86_64 root=UUID=cccccccccccc rw quiet
		initrd /boot/intel-ucode.img
	}

All UUIDs have been replaced with zzzz ssss … etc.

Ok, I learned that Manjaro’s grub can start ALL OTHER systems but other systems can not get a bootable entry for Manjaro. Accepted! With cold heart!

But once Manjaro’s grub is updated it loses all other entries.
Now on trying to get something back with a bootable usb disk you get everything back but lose Manjaro. When you enter root shell only mode in Manjaro and update-grub, or reintall it, or else, then it just replicates the broken menu entry it already finds, making all other Manjaro entries broken.

After 4-5 installations on at least 2 machines and usb sticks the same thing happened over and over.

THE ONLY FIX

is keeping an original grub.cfg and cutting and pasting the good parts on the updated bad grub update. On a system with auto-updates by clicking an icon this gets really scary as it may be the last time you are seeing your desktop!

EVERYTHING IS HACKED TO WORK NOW

Thanks for the advice there is nothing unique in my hardware or my installation procedure. The hardware is in standard Linux supported architectures unaltered from factory. Not latest stuff but run pretty much anything from fBSD to Linux, to Lin from scratch … but mostly Debian. I never had to do this before. I’ve had up to 6 sticks with different systems plugged in and updating-grub will find all of them and they would all boot up their system from that one screen. This is a first that I had to hack grub.cfg so extensively, and I change backgrounds, colors, beeps and whistles manually. Now my Manjaro boot-up screen looks Black and Red with an opaque image in the background and makes funny beep-beep when it starts telling me my custom 9" are about to expire to default land.

PS Advice to all, do not publish your very unique and personal UUIDs on the net, they are more unique than your DNA map.

Honestly, I don’t know if you want to continue on grub subject. But if you fixed it, I have no problem with anything anybody does that they are happy with; looks like you’re happy, so …good and carry on.

One unrelated thing…you said.

PS Advice to all, do not publish your very unique and personal UUIDs on the net, they are more unique than your DNA map.

I often ask people to provide this so that I can write out the menuentry for them. I didn’t know it is that dangorous. Can you provide a link on this danger and perhaps your own opinion on it? I wonder how I can proceed to help it this is not provided then.

My fstab works fine with local and net drives.
My swap is a swap file in a partition that is mounted at boot from any system, same file common work area partition. It all worked before with other systems and it is working fine now after the last installation and several reboots. But it is irrelevant to the grub confusion, I believe, unless Manjaro’s grub is so unique and undocumented we can not yet understand it.

But this is no place as it is for entry level starters on linux.
I have backed up and cloned several systems to have learned not to shoot myself in the foot with fstab

Over a month has passed and there have been questions elsewhere and nobody has provided an answer to this problem. In a multiboot system if another linux handles grub and updates it, grub entries for manjaro are faulty and will not start the system.

When in Manjaro you
$ grub-install /dev/sda
$ update grub
it only finds manjaro and no other system

The only solution I have found for everytime a kernel or grub get an update is to cut and
paste the entries as stated above, keeping a usb-stick as backup for always being able
to start either system.

Did you provide this?
And you go on with your rant and other irrelevant stuff.[quote=“gohlip, post:11, topic:21543”]
Honestly, I don’t know if you want to continue on grub subject. But if you fixed it, I have no problem with anything anybody does that they are happy with; looks like you’re happy, so …good and carry on.
[/quote]

So, carry on.

Next time use sudo os-prober before update -grub, if prober does not find the partitions they are not mounted so then mount them 1st

I always use sudo, it will not let me do it otherwise, and the partitions are mounted. The weird thing is that when it runs it show how it finds them but the grub.cfg file is rewritten without any of them other than Manjaro.

On emergency situations I have survived with no desktop management, for a few days x-fce is ok.
But kde and gnome are monstrous in size and function, according to my taste. Especially KDE to me is the most irritating destop to look at.

But, … I can always try LXLE

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