Boot options how to remove old ones?

Deleted some redundant entries from my boot menu last night via efibootmger and today one of them is back
BootOrder: 0001,0000,000B,0009,000A
Boot0000* Windows Boot Manager
Boot0001* Manjaro
Boot0009* Hard Drive
Boot000A* CD/DVD Drive
Boot000B ubuntu*

Any idea how I can get rid of it?

I ended up by mounting the efi system partition, and deleting the ubuntu folder recursively, which will be somewhere under the top root /EFI/… folder.
reboot with bootable Linux or Manjaro, and with efibootmgr, try and delete the “ubuntu” entry again.

Update: I did the above 'cause I had removed ubuntu from my system, but if you want to keep the “ubuntu” efi folder, then you could try renaming it, or of course, back it up elsewhere before removal.

1 Like

sudo efibootmgr -b 000B -B

Tried that last night, I only have manjaro and windows 10 on this pc

in my efi folder i have the following folder EFI and in that folder i have Boot, Manjaro, manjaro-grub and Microsoft folders

…sounds similar to my mess a couple days ago, after installing Ubuntu, and Mint,…

i ran into a similar, but much worse issue, when I was playing around with installing mutiple manjaro’s, via m-a CLI-installer:

Needless to say, the multi-manjaro’s were fine, but i also installed a few Ubuntu/LinuxMint uefi/gpt installs along the way, along with UbuntuStufio 17.04, and then it all got fscked up.
btw: everything was setup/installed in grub2/uefi/gpt mode.

And yes,i even tried all the braindead Win10 solutions of useless things like this:
http://www.dell.com/support/article/ca/en/cabsdt1/SLN300987/how-to-repair-the-efi-bootloader-on-a-gpt-hdd-for-windows-7--8--81-and-10-on-your-dell-pc?lang=EN
Or even this bait-n-switch mess:
http://www.easeus.com/partition-manager-software/repair-efi-bootloder-in-windows-10-8-7.html

none of which worked.

Instead, I ended up with a:

grub>

prompt.

The ONLY thing that [allowed me to boot into Win 10], was that “manjaro-grub” efi bootloader that I wasn’t even sure about?. -same as you.
But a
efibootmgr -v
will show you that manjaro, and manjaro-grub, should point to same deivecs?

Everything else failed with “Missing Operating System …” weird enuf ?
And even then, I could not get into a proper grub2 bootmenu unless I typed “exit” at the useless “grub>” prompt.
…it was that bad.

Even when I finally decided to wipe everything off of the disks, the stupid nvram/uefi, in my Gigabyte MB still kept showing me dozens of the same dead boot entries. !?
However, “efibootmgr”, from a bootable, did solve that problem of clearing boot entries,
BUT, I could NOT boot back into Win10, no matter how many “update-grub” I used. My damage was done, but atleast you still have a "“Boot0000* Windows Boot Manager”.

I had to reinstall Win 10, and start again. :slight_smile:
Obviously this all may not help you, but I’m jus letting you know what I failed at.
Your situation may be different?, maybe not.

Summary:
Even Microsoft’s PnP -[plug-n-pray] was never as bad as this non-standardized uefi/gpt fiasco is.

With Bios/MBR I have never had any problems such as these, but hey, if they wanna blame the User, then I’m ALL ears. :wink:

Either way, there’s some interesting troubleshooting ahead.
Gotta start somewhere again.

@RobM
So you’re saying you did ‘efibootmgr -b 000B -B’ and ‘Boot000B* ubuntu’ appears again?
If so, then provide "sudo fdisk -l’ (provide all output (all disks) from a single command from Manjaro terminal - and isn’t that obvious, people? - sigh). Also provide explanation what these OS partitions are, eg, Manjaro in sda4, etc…

1 Like

I’m semi-guessing here, but it sounds like some *buntu uefi install had coupled/overwritten a file within the EFI/Microsoft/Boot… folder, a *.efi file, and it keep’s getting picked up,?
not sure, wish I could help more.

I have a different guess (he has still Ubuntu traces in his drives), but we won’t know for sure until Rob provides his output.
And my ‘outburst’ (sorry to the folks here) over ‘full disclosure’ on ‘fdisk -l’ is because of some of the previous topics where the output were not complete or worse, modified.

Also wondering what this ‘manjaro-grub’ in his EFI folder is.

Cheers.

Situation was worse prior to this I had already cleaned out 1 manjaro 1 antergos and an unbuntu from the list, its just this I cannot find lol

Summary

[sudo] password for rob:
Disk /dev/sdb: 931.5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectorsThis text will be hidden
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: B09C1704-18F3-4302-9A96-8625D87D906D

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sdb1 2048 929519615 929517568 443.2G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sdb2 929519616 1953525134 1024005519 488.3G Linux filesystem

Disk /dev/sda: 111.8 GiB, 120034123776 bytes, 234441648 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 7D86417C-51F2-4A34-A75A-F796916F5774

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 2048 923647 921600 450M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda2 923648 1128447 204800 100M EFI System
/dev/sda3 1128448 1161215 32768 16M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda4 1161216 108609535 107448320 51.2G Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda5 108609536 234441614 125832079 60G Linux filesystem

Sorry RobM, I am still not clear about this. (And it may be I have a comprehension gap).[quote=“RobM, post:10, topic:20035”]
Situation was worse prior to this I had already cleaned out 1 manjaro 1 antergos and an unbuntu from the list, its just this I cannot find lol
[/quote]

What is this ‘this’ that you cannot find?

(1) Perhaps an output (I thought I had this understood) of

efibootmgr

Would be good

(2) An explanation of what sdb2 is
(3) An explanation of what sda5 is
(4) What you want done (in different words - for me - sorry).

Cheers. be cool. :slight_smile:

What is this ‘this’ that you cannot find?

(1) Perhaps an output (I thought I had this understood) of

efibootmgr

Would be good

(2) An explanation of what sdb2 is
(3) An explanation of what sda5 is
(4) What you want done (in different words - for me - sorry).

Cheers. be cool. :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Sorry for confusion :stuck_out_tongue:
efibootmgr is in my opening post which still contains “This” which is the ubuntu entry which is also displayed in the boot options if I select F12 on bootup
My drives consist if an SSD and a HDD
SSD
sda1 = windows recovery partition 450Mb
sda2 = boot efi 100Mb
sda3 = MS reserved 16Mb
sda4 = windows 10 install 51Gb
sda5 = Manjaro /
HDD
sdb1 = data storage shared with Win/Manjaro 500Gb
sdb2 = Manjaro /home 500Gb

So my system only has Manjaro and Windows 10 yet even after removing the old entries for the antergos and 2 ubuntus i can still see ubuntu and want to know how to remove it short of wiping the SSD and reinstalling Windows and Manjaro

Right,
o remove ubuntu directory /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu
o then ‘sudo efibootmgr -b 000B -B’ (check/reconfirm 000B is ubuntu bootorder)

sudo rm -Rf /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu
sudo efibootmgr -b 000B -B

1 Like

Thank you so much gohlip that worked :slight_smile:

1 Like

LoL, and that’s basically what I suggested in my very 1st reply…!?

:wink:

Yes, indeed.
Sometimes its sad some voices don’t get heard, however true.
But as long as you know you’re right, that’s all it matters.

So go get a beer, it’s on me. :grin:

2 Likes

I had already done it twice yet it had remained there so no idea why it worked the 3rd time regardless thank you both for helping me get it resolved it is very much appreciated

1 Like

It’s all good, glad it worked. :slight_smile:

@gohlip

I had the same issues as well, with win 10 on my system, but I think I nailed it now
I disabled “hibernation” and “fast startup” in win10, (which is always on by default).
Since then, efibootmgr can manage ALL the boot options now, effortlessly.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 30 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.

Forum kindly sponsored by Bytemark