910 empty files named 'mounts' beneath /proc/ on my system - WHAT FOR?

This is not the problem I expect to solve here right now, but, my desktop Manjaro Linux System, with 16G of RAM and an Intel i3-8100 CPU processor, has been hanging. At best I have to resort to re-booting. At worst, I have to to turn the power off and then on again. To fix this, I am attempting to properly enable the use one of my swap partitions (I have two 20G partitions, one on /dev/sda and the other on /dev/sdb) at boot time. For a while it seems that I had succeeded in enabling the swap partitions and had stopped my system from hanging, but, somehow, that seems no longer to be the case.

What I hope to find out here is why, on my system, there are currently 910 empty files named ‘mounts’ beneath /proc/

Further below is some of the data I have posted to 910 empty files named 'mounts' listed beneath /proc on Manjaro Linux - Pastebin.com . The full list of these empty ‘mounts’ files, both unsorted and sorted by the file update date, can be found there.

Rather than ‘ls -l’, I have used my own bash shell script lsi to display the names and attributes of each ‘found’ file. ‘lsi’ prepends the date in the format “%Y%m%d%H%M” onto the front of each record to more easily facilitate sorting in timestamp order. A copy of the ‘lsi’ script is also at 910 empty files named 'mounts' listed beneath /proc on Manjaro Linux - Pastebin.com)

The FIRST LIST of empty files named ‘mount’ below is the output from:

$ sudo find /proc -type f -name mounts -exec lsi {} ; >/tmp/mountFiles

The SECOND LIST is the SORTED output of the above:

$ sort </tmp/mountFiles > /tmp/sortedMountFiles

I tried to find documentation for these empty ‘mounts’ files, but couldn’t.

Could anyone explain to me if there is a simple explanation for what all these empty files named ‘mounts’ is and, if so, where is the documentation?

If there is no simple explanation, then, perhaps these 910 ‘mounts’ are a symptom of that other problem - my inabilty to enable the use of a swap partition at boot time.

Now, I will attempt to re-apply my previous fix of enabling the use of a swap partition. Whether or not that prevents the appearance of all those ‘mounts’ files, I would still appreciate knowing their cause.

Thank you for your attention.

James

APPENDIX 1. (Some of) THE FIRST LIST OF EMPTY FILES NAMED ‘mount’

202111071227 0 /proc/1/task/1/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/1/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/2/task/2/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/2/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/3/task/3/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/3/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/4/task/4/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/4/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/6/task/6/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/6/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/8/task/8/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/8/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/9/task/9/mounts

202111071328 0 /proc/9149/mounts
202111071328 0 /proc/9151/task/9151/mounts
202111071328 0 /proc/9151/mounts

APPENDIX 2. (Some of) above LIST OF FILES SORTED

202111071227 0 /proc/100/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/100/task/100/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/1024/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/1024/task/1024/mounts
202111071227 0 /proc/1024/task/1026/mounts

202111071328 0 /proc/9149/task/9149/mounts
202111071328 0 /proc/9151/mounts
202111071328 0 /proc/9151/task/9151/mounts

I don’t know whether this is any help to you, but:
/proc is a pseudo filesystem …

for example explained here:

proc(5) — Arch manual pages

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Thank you, Nachlese.

I can now see from reading the proc (5) documentation that this large number of empty files named `mounts’ (amongst others named node, spurious, effective_affinity,effective_affinity_list, etc.), help the kernel keep track of the different resources used by the different processes and not any symptom of my computer malfunctioning.

I was led into finding all these ‘mounts’ files by looking at /etc/fstab and /etc/mtab to see if I could enable the mounting of a swap partition.

The latter file, /etc/mtab, being a link to /proc/self/mounts, caused me to search for other files named ‘mounts’ beneath /proc/.

Finding so many files named ‘mounts’ did not seem right given my limited understanding of this. So I feared that this might be a symptom of something seriously wrong with my system - possibly the same problem that caused my system to lose its ability to enable use of a swap partition, but I can now see that I was wrong.

I suspect the latter problem with my swap partition will be easy to fix, once I begin re-reading the documentation.

Thank you again for your help.

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